Tag Archives: driverless cars

2031

In the year 2031, I most-likely will be in prison. Maybe sooner, or maybe a little later, but I just can’t imagine my life’s path detouring in any other direction. Of course, this prediction is only plausible if Lord willing I’m even still around in 2031. It’s not too difficult to see where this country is headed, and I can’t envision any type of escape from what I perceive as the inevitable. I’m not alluding to our deplorable political landscape although I suppose ultimately it will be our government’s justice system deciding my fate in the near future. The reason for my probable transitioning from a law-abiding citizen to a willing lawbreaker will undoubtedly be due to – in a word – technology. Rather, more explicitly, it will be my refusal to embrace some technology that will provoke a prison sentence by 2031.

Many things I disapprove of have become acceptable in today’s society, and that’s okay. However, there’s much speculation that some things I’m opposed to may eventually become mandatory, and that I cannot (will not) accept. One such thing on the horizon is the possibility of being forced to utilize driverless cars. It has been rumored that in the near future we might all be required to surrender our driving skills to “intelligent” sensory control systems. Supposedly, computers are better drivers than people.

The main reason commonly given, for enacting an autonomous vehicles only policy, is the anticipated reduction in collisions on our roadways. I’m sure we could reduce accidents, without banning physical drivers, by prohibiting cell phone use while driving, imposing stricter penalties on repeat offenders, and expanding photo enforcement nationwide. I’m not averse to those who are fond of the new technology, but I am against revoking a person’s choice in the process. I know I for one will not give up my right to manually control my own vehicle. I will continue tooling around town in my laguna blue Dodge Dart regardless of any new laws that may be imposed concerning self-driving cars.

Another thing which might land me in the slammer is in regards to dealing with our beloved government every April. I fill out my tax returns by hand, and I like it that way. That’s how I’ve done it for 34 years, but now the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) suggests (almost demands) I file my returns online. Each year I have to call the IRS to request the most recent instructions booklet, and each year the government’s representative on the other end, not even attempting to conceal his disgust towards me, argues his case for why I should file via computer. Each year he loses. However, I’m painfully aware my preferred choice of filing will one day be taken away. The day I have no other option than to file my tax returns online is the day I no longer file tax returns. This will surely pose a problem for me, and it may very well be the reason I’ll likely be sporting state issued, black and white striped attire in 2031.

If neither my refusal to get on board with driverless cars, nor my intentional refraining from filing tax returns electronically, sends me to the big house then possibly the contempt I have for drones will. I despise the uprising of drone enthusiasts, and I think it’s sort of ridiculous for anyone to own one solely for personal use. The preceding sentence reminds me of an episode of Seinfeld when Jerry, during a family dinner conversation at Manya’s house, amusingly says, “I hate anyone that ever had a pony when they were growing up.” Of course, the elderly Manya immediately divulges that she had a pony as a young girl. Can you say awwwkwaaard? My apologies, if I too offended, but let me explain.

Drones have increasingly been showing up on countless Christmas lists, of the young and old alike the past couple of years, and this is quite bothersome to me concerning my privacy. I do not wish any harm on drone owners, but I don’t want their voyeuristic robots anywhere in the vicinity of my residence. The lion’s share of drones have both photo taking and live streaming capabilities. It is my understanding a drone can legally invade my home’s airspace, but it’s illegal if I see fit to capture it or shoot the hovering nuisance out of the sky. I don’t think I can play by those rules; hence, appointing myself as judge and jury in the matter could realistically result in me being fitted for an orange jumpsuit by the year 2031. I live in Arizona. It’s hot! I should be able to shed my clothing in my own backyard without having to worry about an uninvited drone joining the party. I will not give up my constitutional right to privacy.

This past decade I’ve seen much that is wrong with our country’s infatuation with technology. I’ve witnessed cellphones (and the like) replace meaningful relationships. I’ve seen the blatant discrimination against those who would rather pay their baggage fees at the airport than beforehand online; The airlines charge more if paying in person. I’ve also noticed the obvious bias against traditional coupon clippers and people who prefer to pay with cash. Grocery stores have begun presenting their best deals to only those who are willing (and able) to download digital coupons, and some businesses are now offering consumers more if they pay with plastic instead of with cash. I recently experienced this type of injustice firsthand when putting air in my car’s tires at a local convenience store. Using a credit card would’ve given me 5 minutes worth of air whereas good ole American currency only afforded me 4 minutes for the same price.

We are continuously coaxed (strong-armed), many times by way of a small threat to our pocketbooks, into using debit or credit cards and managing all of our finances and business transactions online. Why go that route? The last I knew, one’s identity cannot be stolen or their life hacked into when using cash. For convenience? In my household we use the tried-and-true envelope system, so online banking would actually be a great inconvenience to us. Do we kowtow to every technological advancement simply because we want to appear as though we too are hip (or whatever the kids are calling it these days) and to avoid pompously being accused of “not being with it” or “still living in the horse and buggy days”?

To each his own I guess. I know it’s much easier to conform…to society…to the government…to the world. There just comes a time when enough is enough. For me, I can never accept commuting in driverless cars, submitting tax returns online, or drones invading my personal space. I may be in the world, but I am not of this world. My hope is I’ll be able to joyfully sing like Paul and Silas, knowing God holds the key, while locked behind prison doors in 2031.


If I Was To Run For President

If I was to run for president it would be history in the making. I would take a completely unconventional path to the White House. First, I would compose a list of all of the inappropriate things I have ever done, throughout my entire life, and I’d present it to the media the day I entered the race. The neatly typed document would include my juvenile record although I was promised my early indiscretion would be expunged on my 18th birthday. However, in today’s world of mischievous computer hackers, and so much personal information now floating around in “the cloud” (whatever that is), I’m not so sure that promise wouldn’t be broken. Regardless, I would hope my egging transgression, committed at the age of 16, would not be a deal breaker for the American public.

Next, I would refuse to give any additional detailed information, concerning the lengthy list, or even make mention again of my prior sins for that matter. So many candidates have said they’re through discussing specific issues, from their past, but then they continue talking about them whenever hounded by the press. I absolutely would not retreat from my vow of silence in regards to my distant past. If I was to run for president I would not make any promises, but I would be totally transparent with my devised agenda. My modest qualifications, for the position of president, includes earning a high school diploma, operating a fairly successful business (for 5 years), and possessing common sense. My formal education certainly pales in comparison to practically everyone, but the latter attribute (common sense) is seemingly absent amongst the majority of those who are currently occupying the political arena.

If I was to run for president it would be as an Independent. I do not fully agree, or disagree, with either of the two major parties’ platforms. In addition, I’m adamantly opposed to partisanship; therefore, if I was elected president I’d be able to form partnerships with Democrats and Republicans alike to do what’s best for the country. However, collaborating with the Tea Party might be a different story. I blame their existence, these past several years, for the much needed compromise missing in Congress.

I’m all for fiscal responsibility but not at all costs to the American public. Those Grover Norquist pledges, signed by almost all of the Tea Party clan, are utter nonsense. I assuredly would not add to the nation’s outrageous debt, but I wouldn’t be able to balance its budget either. (Not even if I had a full 8 years and a compromising Congress.) No one could responsibly make this country solvent again, after 14 plus years of careless overspending, in that short amount of time.

If I was president I’d be fine with leaving some issues left up to the states to decide, but generally I prefer consistency throughout the land especially when it comes to public safety. I would aim to make texting while driving illegal (nationwide) with a mandatory jail sentence even for first-time offenders. I’m a proponent of having a required sentence already in place, for all life-threatening infractions, so violators will be well aware of their punishment beforehand; hence, acting as a deterrent to those contemplating breaking any laws. Potential lawbreakers may be more apt to reconsider their actions when knowing there’s an unavoidable harsh penalty awaiting them. I have no tolerance for anyone who foolishly puts another person’s life at risk.

I definitely place computer hackers into that category, near the top, of people who need to be dealt with in a severe manner. I’m not sure if those hackers, who are “genius” enough to disable a moving vehicle or redirect the flight plan of a commercial airplane, are truly trying to cause harm or if they’re wreaking havoc on innocent people simply because they can. Regardless, anybody who’s inclined to tamper with the safety of others needs to realize that would not be acceptable on my watch. I not only have contempt for hackers like “patriotic whistleblower,” Edward Snowden, but I’m not too fond of those who blatantly shine their laser pointers into the cockpits of airplanes, temporarily blinding the unsuspecting pilots, as well. Again, I’m in favor of having mandatory jail sentences for the likes of these people.

If I was elected as President of the United States I would not attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). I believe our nation’s healthcare system was much worse before “Obamacare,” so I wouldn’t be willing to revert to the way that it was. However, I would listen to anyone with a legitimate suggestion for improving the ACA. I’m not too familiar with the specifics of Medicaid or Medicare, but I’ve often wondered if combining those programs with “Obamacare,” into a single entity, would be a cost saving measure somehow. I do think President Obama made a mistake, through one of his many executive orders, by quashing the government’s policy of threatening prosecution for anyone negotiating with terrorists. Now, American families can make deals, with known terrorist groups, for the release of a confined family member. This sets a horrible precedent, and only the wealthiest Americans would have a legitimate shot at paying the necessary ransom to free their loved ones. That’s not right!

I am anti-war. It’s quite sobering when pondering the accumulated costs, both financially and in American lives, due to our nation’s involvement in unjust wars over the years. I proudly hold an isolationist’s viewpoint because in general I don’t think it’s appropriate to get involved in other countries’ affairs. I also don’t believe in forcing our type of government, no matter how wonderful it may be, on any other nation. I highly doubt if we’d appreciate it if the tables were turned. I imagine the United States of America would fight tooth and nail to keep from being subjected to another country’s form of government. Remember the Revolutionary War? Obviously, I would not hesitate to declare war if we were ever attacked on our own soil.

If I was sworn into office my agenda would surely include nixing any further development of driverless cars and putting the kibosh on the use of drones in residential areas. It’s apparent, at least to me, there are numerous drawbacks with both of these technological advancements including losing some of our beloved freedoms. We should maintain the right to drive our vehicles, and expect privacy in our own backyards, but that’s not where we’re headed. As president I would also advocate for the disbandment of affirmative action, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). I desire a country where equality actually means equality.

If I was president I’d petition for all grand jury rulings, of the racially charged kind (whether real or imagined), to be read in the morning instead of in the evening as currently tends to be the case. I think this simple change would most-likely prevent the spontaneous actions of many miscreants looking for a “justifiable” reason to loot and vandalize their neighborhoods. I figure delinquents are more prone to disregard the law in the shadows of the night than during daytime hours. Announcing verdicts before lunch would allow for heated citizens to cool down, and to reconsider their contemplated endeavors, before the sun sets. If they still choose to instantly riot at least the culprits’ identities would be less difficult to capture in the light of day.

If I was to run for president I would have no chance of winning whatsoever. I would not have any special interest groups backing me; therefore, I would not have the money to launch a competitive campaign. I know I lack the education, experience, and name recognition needed to become a viable candidate for president. Oh, and did I mention the money? I am certain I’d make a better president than anyone who has already entered the race, but it’s just not possible for a transparent Independent with common sense to be victorious at this time. I guess the making of history will have to wait.